Building Codes: Driving Growth through Innovation, Resilience and Safety

Building Safety Month – May, 2017 Proclamation

To help raise awareness of building safety, the Borough of Steelton Office of Code Enforcement proudly celebrates Building Safety Month during May. Building Safety Month is a public safety awareness campaign to help individuals, families and businesses understand what it takes to create safe, resilient, affordable and energy-efficient homes and buildings.

“When our building safety and fire prevention experts inspect buildings and review construction plans to ensure code compliance they help to ensure the places where you live, learn, work, worship and play are safe,” said Borough of Steelton, Director of Code Enforcement/Building Code Official, Amrinder Singh. “We work closely with homebuilders, contractors, plumbers, roofers and other construction industry trades to provide maximum public safety.”

Amrinder Singh

Amrinder Singh, Director of Code Enforcement/Building Code Official

Each year, presidential, gubernatorial and municipal proclamations are approved to bring attention to Building Safety Month. This year’s theme is Code Officials — Partners in Community Safety and Economic Growth. Weekly themes during Building Safety Month are: May 1–7, Mentoring the Next Generation of Building Professionals; May 8–14, Building Design Solutions for All Ages; May 15–21, Manage the Damage — Preparing for Natural Disasters; and May 22–28, Investing in Technology for Safety, Energy & Water Efficiency.

The Borough of Steelton will be celebrating Building Safety Month on Thursday May 25, 2017 @5PM at the Council Chambers in Borough Hall. The Office of Code Enforcement would like to invite all constituents including but not limited to property owners, tenants, business owners, and investors to this event to learn more about Building, Property Maintenance, Zoning, and other Borough Codes & Ordinances. Director of Code Enforcement/Building Code Official, Amrinder Singh, will also be sharing statistics from the department’s 2016 annual report, discuss the exciting new technology improvements that are currently being implemented for the department, and provide an update on the progress for the introduction of new ordinances that he, Borough Manager Doug Brown, along with Borough Council, & Mayor are presently working on to help increase property values and raising the quality of life.

Homes and buildings that are built in compliance with building safety codes result in resilient structures that minimize the risks of death, injury and property damage. Regardless of the department code officials work in—building, fire, planning or elsewhere—they work hard every day to provide public safety by ensuring buildings are constructed safely. Because resilient structures minimize the risk of property damage, property owners may pay lower insurance costs and millions of taxpayer dollars can be saved when rebuilding from natural disasters.

Based on building science, technical knowledge and past experiences, model building codes provide protection from man-made and natural disasters, guarding public health and reducing property losses. The codes address all aspects of construction, from structural to fire prevention, plumbing and mechanical systems, and energy efficiency.

Building codes have protected the public for thousands of years. The earliest known code of law—the Code of Hammurabi, king of the Babylonian Empire, written circa 2200 B.C.—assessed severe penalties, including death, if a building was not constructed safely. The regulation of building construction in the United States dates back to the 1700s. In the early-1900s, the insurance industry and others with similar concerns developed the first model building code.

The International Code Council, a U.S.-based membership association, created Building Safety Month as a public service to promote safety in the built environment. Code Council members develop the family of International Codes and standards used in the design, build and compliance process to construct safe, sustainable, affordable and resilient structures. Most U.S. communities use the Council’s codes.