Police Plans Investment Management Professional Services

Notice is hereby given that Steelton Borough is seeking proposals for Investment Management Professional Services. Written proposals, in accordance with the specifications and procedures identified in a RFP available from the Borough of Steelton will be received at the following address: ATTN: Douglas E. Brown, Frederick Douglas Municipal Building, 123 North Front Street, Steelton, PA 17113. Proposals must be received no later than March 9, 2018 at 4:30pm.

Services for which Proposals are Sought: Investment management of the Steelton Borough Police Pension Plan.

Specifications Relating to the Services: Firms submitting proposals shall demonstrate knowledge of and experience with the investment management of municipal pension plans, and experience and expertise in performing the work involved in the RFP.

Procedures to Compete for the Contracts: Applicants shall complete proposals in accordance with the RFP available at the www.steeltonpa.com and submit proposal to the Borough of Steelton by March 9, 2018. After verification by the Borough of Steelton that the proposals are complete, the Borough of Steelton will evaluate and interview the qualification and experience of each firm submitting a proposal and will select the most qualified firm.

Required Disclosures: All disclosures required under Act 44 of 2009, including, but not limited to, disclosure by each person, including subcontractors who will be providing services to the Steelton Borough of the following:

  • a description of the responsibilities of each person providing services under the contract;
  • whether the individual is now or was a Borough of Steelton official or employee;
  • whether each individual was employed or compensated by a third-party to communicate with a Borough of Steelton official or employee;
  • contributions in the past five years of at least $500 made to Borough of Steelton officials;
  • whether a former Borough of Steelton employee has participated in the submission, review or negotiation of the proposal;
  • gifts to any Borough of Steelton official or employee; the existence of any financial, commercial, or business relationship with a Borough of Steelton official;
  • the retention of any third-party intermediary, agent or lobbyist and his or her duties; and
  • whether there has been any communication with the Borough of Steelton following the publication of this ad.

ACT44 RFP Police Pension

Non –Uniform Pension Plans Investment Management Professional Services

Notice is hereby given that Steelton Borough is seeking proposals for Investment Management Professional Services. Written proposals, in accordance with the specifications and procedures identified in a RFP available from the Borough of Steelton will be received at the following address: ATTN: Douglas E. Brown, Frederick Douglas Municipal Building, 123 North Front Street, Steelton, PA 17113.  Proposals must be received no later than March 9, 2018 at 4:30pm.

Services for which Proposals are Sought: Investment management of the Steelton Borough Non-Uniform Pension Plan.

Specifications Relating to the Services: Firms submitting proposals shall demonstrate knowledge of and experience with the investment management of municipal pension plans, and experience and expertise in performing the work involved in the RFP.

Procedures to Compete for the Contracts: Applicants shall complete proposals in accordance with the RFP available at the www.steeltonpa.com and submit proposal to the Borough of Steelton by March 9, 2018. After verification by the Borough of Steelton that the proposals are complete, the Borough of Steelton will evaluate and interview the qualification and experience of each firm submitting a proposal and will select the most qualified firm.

Required Disclosures: All disclosures required under Act 44 of 2009, including, but not limited to, disclosure by each person, including subcontractors who will be providing services to the Steelton Borough of the following:

  • a description of the responsibilities of each person providing services under the contract;
  • whether the individual is now or was a Borough of Steelton official or employee;
  • whether each individual was employed or compensated by a third-party to communicate with a Borough of Steelton official or employee;
  • contributions in the past five years of at least $500 made to Borough of Steelton officials;
  • whether a former Borough of Steelton employee has participated in the submission, review or negotiation of the proposal;
  • gifts to any Borough of Steelton official or employee; the existence of any financial, commercial, or business relationship with a Borough of Steelton official;
  • the retention of any third-party intermediary, agent or lobbyist and his or her duties; and
  • whether there has been any communication with the Borough of Steelton following the publication of this ad.

ACT 44 RFP Non-Uniform Pension

Tier II DBP Violation

Chlorine Contact Tank and DBP Reduction Measures Showing Effectiveness

On September 8, 2017, the Steelton Borough Authority placed its chlorine contact tank into operation after a nearly year-long project. The tank coupled with DBP reduction measures that have already been put into place are actively reducing disinfection byproducts as expected.

Customers should expect public notices in the future due to test results from earlier in the year (before the tank was operational) factoring into the yearly running average. However, we anticipate that once the higher results from earlier this year are no longer factored into the running average, public notices will stop. We also anticipate the tank and DBP measures to effectively reduce DBPs to below the MCL going forward.

Recent tests that were conducted after the chlorine contact tank went into operation show that it is already effectively reducing DBP levels—in most instances below the maximum contaminant level. The Authority is anticipating DBP levels from now on to consistently remain below the levels used for compliance barring extraordinary circumstances.

The current public notice stems from a high running annual average for DBPs that can be heavily attributed to the high levels recorded before the contact tank was operational and other DBP reduction measures were enacted at the plant.

The table below shows the most recent test results both before and after the tank was operational.
Except for one HAA5 sampling at Site 700, which was marginally above the MCL, all test results post contact tank are well below the MCL at all testing sites and exhibit a trend of consistent reduction.

Site 700 Site 700 Site 701 Site 701
Sample Date TTHM* HAA5** TTHM* HAA5**
8/8/2017 – Pre-Tank 0.108 0.032 0.105 0.043
9/14/2017 – Post Tank 0.064 NA 0.061 NA
11/8/2017 0.048 0.062 0.052 0.039

*TTHM MCL = 0.080
**HAA5 MCL =0.060

The Steelton Borough Authority will continue to make supplemental improvements that continue to reduce DBPs and is encouraged by the trends seen above.
We thank residents for their patience as we made the necessary capital improvements to reduce DBPs. The contact tank is now operational and going forward we anticipate DBP levels to be well below the MCL.

Below we have defined the technical terms associated with fully understanding this notice and answers to frequently asked questions:

Important Terms:

Chlorine Contact Tank: A 260,000-gallon contact tank that will allow for the chlorination of water post-filtration thus reducing the occurrence of disinfection byproducts.

Disinfection Byproducts (DBP): Chemicals found in drinking water when disinfectants such as chlorine react with naturally-occurring materials to form byproducts. Disinfectants, like chlorine, are used to kill microbes that can cause disease (e.g. gastrointestinal illness). Long-term exposures to consistently high levels of some disinfection byproducts have been associated with an increased risk of cancer.

Haloacetic Acids (HAA5) and Trihalomethanes (TTHMs): Disinfection byproducts that may, when consistently consumed in large quantities over a long period of time, slightly increase the risk for certain health impacts.

Locational Running Annual Average (LRAA): The average of the four most recent quarterly samples collected at specific sample sites. Each quarter, the LRAA is recalculated for purposes of determining compliance and the need for a public notice.

Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL): The maximum level of DBPs in parts per million that can exist in drinking water and remain compliant with EPA standards.

Source Water: Raw water that is drawn from the Susquehanna River and treated at the Steelton Water Treatment Plant. After treatment, the water is distributed through a network of water lines to Steelton residents.

Testing Locations: Two locations chosen in consultation with DEP that historically have the highest levels of DBPs.  Test sites most likely represent the worst-case reading for the system at any given time.

Turbidity: The cloudiness of raw source water. Turbidity is indicative of the amount of matter in source water and is higher when the Susquehanna River is more turbulent (i.e. during rain storms and high river levels). High turbidity many times indicates more organic matter thus higher DBPs.

Why am I receiving another drinking water violation notice?
The enclosed non-emergency notice is required due to the LRAA for Haloacetic Acids (HAA5) and Trihalomethanes (TTHMs) being higher than the maximum contaminant level at one testing site (Site 701). Both TTHMs and HAA5s tested below the MCL at both sites this quarter. However, higher results from before the contact tank was operational led to our average remaining above the maximum, hence this notice.

Are HAA5 and TTHM violations unique to Steelton’s water system?
No. Many water systems in the country are dealing with TTHM and HAA5 violations due to more stringent EPA standards, changes in testing/reporting requirements, and aging water treatment infrastructure. Complying with these standards requires older water systems like Steelton’s to make long-term capital improvements. Steelton just completed its Chlorine Contact Tank Project and placed the tank in operation. We are already seeing significant reductions in DBPs since placing the tank in service.

Why do disinfection byproducts like HAA5s and TTHMs occur in our water?
Virtually all water systems have disinfection byproducts of some level due to the fact that chlorine remains the most widely used chemical for water disinfection in the world. According to the Center for Disease Control, “Chlorine revolutionized water purification, reduced the incidence of waterborne diseases across the western world,” and “chlorination and/or filtration of drinking water has been hailed as the major public health achievement of the 20th century.” It is necessary to chlorinate water to eliminate bacteria that causes immediate emergency health risks. No such emergency health risks are occurring due to Steelton’s continued treatment of water.

While chlorination kills harmful pathogens in water (the primary concern of water treatment facilities), the process of chlorine interacting with organic material in water creates what are known as disinfection byproducts, primarily Trihalomethanes and Haloacetic Acids.

The most recent Filter Plant Performance Evaluation study by DEP found that operational standards and procedures at the plant are satisfactory and significantly improved. The only remaining course to address the DBP issue is to upgrade water plant infrastructure. This is being accomplished by the construction of the Chlorine Contact Tank and the addition of other equipment at the water plant.

It is recognized that the removal of immediate pathogenic threats in water through chlorination takes first priority. Higher levels of disinfection byproducts are considered a Tier II non-acute violation (like the one enclosed). A lack of chlorination and the resulting microbial pathogens that would be present in water, represent a Tier I emergency violation.

Am I required to buy bottled water?
No. DEP and EPA clearly state that you do not need to change your source of water.

What if I have concerns about long term health risks associated with HAA5s and TTHMs?
Please consult your physician if you have any concerns about health risks associated with HAA5s and TTHMs.

What is the Water Authority doing to reduce/eliminate DBPs?
On September 8, 2017, the Chlorine Contact Tank was officially placed into operation. The tank, in conjunction with new DBP monitoring equipment and changes to treatment strategies, has already led to a reduction in DBPs below the maximum level. We will continue to work diligently to ensure levels remain below the MCL.

If you have any additional questions about disinfection byproducts or what we are doing, and have done, to ensure your drinking water is safe, please feel free to contact me at 717-939-9842 or Mark Handley at 717-939-0425 Ext. 5110. Douglas E. Brown, Borough Manager and Authority Secretary.

Tier II DBP Violation

Tier II DBP Violation

Chlorine Contact Tank and DBP Reduction Measures Complete

Latest samples show reduction in DBPs to Compliant Levels

On September 8, 2017, the Steelton Borough Authority placed its chlorine contact tank into operation after a nearly year-long project. The tank coupled with DBP reduction measures that have already been put into place are anticipated to reduce DBPs well below compliance levels. Recent test results show that DBPs are well below the MCL at both sites.

Customers should expect public notices in the future due to test results from earlier in the year (before the tank was operational) factoring into the yearly running average. However, we anticipate that once the higher results from earlier this year are no longer factored into the running average, public notices will stop. We also anticipate the tank and DBP measures to effectively reduce DBPs to below the MCL going forward.

Recent tests that were conducted after the chlorine contact tank went into operation show that it is already effectively reducing DBP levels well below the maximum levels allowed. The Authority is anticipating DBP levels from now on to consistently remain below the levels used for compliance.

The current Public Notice stems from a high running annual average for DBPs that can be heavily attributed to the high levels recorded before the contact tank was operational and other DBP reduction measures were enacted at the plant.

The table below shows the most recent test results both before and after the tank was operational.

You will notice that HAA5s were below the MCL in pre-tank testing and TTHMs were significantly reduced to levels below the MCL after the tank became operational.

Site 700 Site 700 Site 701 Site 701
Sample Date TTHM* HAA5** TTHM* HAA5**
8/8/2017 – Pre-Tank 0.108 0.032 0.105 0.043
9/14/2017 – Post Tank 0.064 NA 0.061 NA

*TTHM MCL = 0.080
**HAA5 MCL =0.060

As you can see, the most recent pre-contact tank test was over the MCL only for TTHMs. HAA5 levels were well below the MCL at both test locations.

Testing on September 9, 2017, shows that with the contact tank and DBP reduction measures operating, TTHMs were reduced to levels well below the MCL. We are confident that this downward trend will continue and—once the high pre-contact tank results from the past are dropped off of our average—you will stop receiving notices.

The Steelton Borough Authority would like to thank residents for their patience as we made the necessary capital improvements to reduce DBPs. The contact tank is now operational and going forward we anticipate DBP levels to be well below the MCL.

Below we have defined the technical terms associated with fully understanding this notice and answers to frequently asked questions:

Important Terms:

Chlorine Contact Tank: A 260,000-gallon contact tank that will allow for the chlorination of water post-filtration thus reducing the occurrence of disinfection byproducts.

Disinfection Byproducts (DBP): Chemicals found in drinking water when disinfectants such as chlorine react with naturally-occurring materials to form byproducts. Disinfectants, like chlorine, are used to kill microbes that can cause disease (e.g. gastrointestinal illness). Long-term exposures to consistently high levels of some disinfection byproducts have been associated with an increased risk of cancer.

Haloacetic Acids (HAA5) and Trihalomethanes (TTHMs): Disinfection byproducts that may, when consistently consumed in large quantities over a long period of time, slightly increase the risk for certain health impacts.

Locational Running Annual Average (LRAA): The average of the four most recent quarterly samples collected at specific sample sites. Each quarter, the LRAA is recalculated for purposes of determining compliance and the need for a public notice.

Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL): The maximum level of DBPs in parts per million that can exist in drinking water and remain compliant with EPA standards.

Source Water: Raw water that is drawn from the Susquehanna River and treated at the Steelton Water Treatment Plant. After treatment, the water is distributed through a network of water lines to Steelton residents.

Testing Locations: Two locations chosen in consultation with DEP that historically have the highest levels of DBPs.  Test sites most likely represent the worst-case reading for the system at any given time.

Turbidity: The cloudiness of raw source water. Turbidity is indicative of the amount of matter in source water and is higher when the Susquehanna River is more turbulent (i.e. during rain storms and high river levels). High turbidity many times indicates more organic matter thus higher DBPs.

Why am I receiving another drinking water violation notice?

The enclosed non-emergency notice is required due to the LRAA for Haloacetic Acids (HAA5) and Trihalomethanes (TTHMs) being higher than the maximum contaminant level at both testing locations for this quarter.

HAA5 levels for this quarter actually tested below the MCL. However, due to higher levels in the prior three quarters, the running average remained above the 0.06 mark.

TTHM levels for this quarter tested above the MCL at 0.108 and 0.105 at the respective testing sites. However, post-contact tank testing revealed that TTHMs were lowered to .064 and .061 at each site. This is well below the 0.08 MCL level. We are confident TTHMs and HAA5s will remain below the MCL for prospective quarters.

Are HAA5 and TTHM violations unique to Steelton’s water system?

No. Many water systems in the country are dealing with TTHM and HAA5 violations due to more stringent EPA standards, changes in testing/reporting requirements, and aging water treatment infrastructure. Complying with these standards requires older water systems like Steelton’s to make long-term capital improvements. Steelton just completed its Chlorine Contact Tank Project and placed the tank in operation. We are already seeing significant reductions in DBPs since placing the tank in service.

Why do disinfection byproducts like HAA5s and TTHMs occur in our water?

Virtually all water systems have disinfection byproducts of some level due to the fact that chlorine remains the most widely used chemical for water disinfection in the world. According to the Center for Disease Control, “Chlorine revolutionized water purification, reduced the incidence of waterborne diseases across the western world,” and “chlorination and/or filtration of drinking water has been hailed as the major public health achievement of the 20th century.” It is necessary to chlorinate water to eliminate bacteria that causes immediate emergency health risks. No such emergency health risks are occurring due to Steelton’s continued treatment of water.

While chlorination kills harmful pathogens in water (the primary concern of water treatment facilities), the process of chlorine interacting with organic material in water creates what are known as disinfection byproducts, primarily Trihalomethanes and Haloacetic Acids.

The most recent Filter Plant Performance Evaluation study by DEP found that operational standards and procedures at the plant are satisfactory and significantly improved. The only remaining course to address the DBP issue is to upgrade water plant infrastructure. This is being accomplished by the construction of the Chlorine Contact Tank and the addition of other equipment at the water plant.

It is recognized that the removal of immediate pathogenic threats in water through chlorination takes first priority. Higher levels of disinfection byproducts are considered a Tier II non-acute violation (like the one enclosed). A lack of chlorination and the resulting microbial pathogens that would be present in water, represent a Tier I emergency violation.

Am I required to buy bottled water?

No. The Department of Environmental Protection and EPA clearly state that you do not need to change your source of water.

What if I have concerns about long term health risks associated with HAA5s?

Please consult your physician if you have any concerns about health risks associated with HAA5s and TTHMs.

What is the Water Authority doing to reduce/eliminate DBPs?

On September 8, 2017, the Chlorine Contact Tank was officially placed into operation. The tank, in conjunction with new DBP monitoring equipment and changes to treatment strategies, has already led to a reduction in DBPs below the maximum level. We will continue to work diligently to ensure levels remain below the MCL.

If you have any additional questions about disinfection by-products or what we are doing, and have done, to ensure your drinking water is safe, please feel free to contact me at 717-939-9842 or Mark Handley at 717-939-0425 Ext. 5110. Douglas E. Brown, Borough Manager and Authority Secretary

Tier II DBP Violation

Tier II DBP Violation

Important Information about the Enclosed Non-Emergency Notice

The Steelton Borough Water Authority and staff take producing the highest quality drinking water very seriously. Over the past two years, the Authority has invested heavily into infrastructure and operational improvements in response to newer and more stringent environmental testing and reporting standards.

Some residents have asked questions about the Public Notices of non-emergency violations like the one enclosed related to disinfection byproducts. Below we have defined the technical terms associated with fully understanding this notice and answers to frequently asked questions:

Important Terms:
Chlorine Contact Tank: A 250,000 gallon contact tank that will allow for the chlorination of water post-filtration thus reducing the occurrence of disinfection byproducts.

Disinfection Byproducts (DBP): Chemicals found in drinking water when disinfectants such as chlorine react with naturally-occurring materials to form byproducts. Disinfectants, like chlorine, are used to kill microbes that can cause disease (e.g. gastrointestinal illness). Long term exposures to consistently high levels of some disinfection byproducts have been associated with an increased risk of cancer.

Haloacetic Acids (HAA5) and Trihalomethanes (TTHMs): Disinfection byproducts that may, when consistently consumed in large quantities over a long period of time, slightly increase the risk for certain health impacts.

Locational Running Annual Average (LRAA): The average of the four most recent quarterly samples collected at specific sample sites. Each quarter, the LRAA is recalculated for purposes of determining compliance and the need for a public notice.

Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL): The maximum level of DBPs in parts per billion that can exist in drinking water and remain compliant with EPA standards.

Source Water: Raw water that is drawn from the Susquehanna River and treated at the Steelton Water Treatment Plant. After treatment, the water is distributed through a network of water lines to Steelton residents.

Testing Locations: Two locations chosen in consultation with DEP that historically have the highest levels of DBPs. Test sites most likely represent the worst-case reading for the system at any given time.

Turbidity: The cloudiness of raw source water. Turbidity is indicative of the amount of matter in source water and is higher when the Susquehanna River is more turbulent (i.e. during rain storms and high river levels). High turbidity many times indicates more organic matter thus higher DBPs.

Why am I receiving another drinking water violation notice?
The enclosed non-emergency notice is required due to the LRAA for Haloacetic Acids (HAA5) and Trihalomethanes (TTHMs) being higher than the maximum contaminant level at both testing locations for this quarter.

The level of HAA5s and TTHMs depends on many factors, including temperature, weather, and source water turbidity. The more organic matter in source water the higher the occurrence of DBPs. Regardless of conditions, the Steelton Water Plant must always chlorinate water to remove immediate pathogens. This treatment process can lead to the formation of DBPs.

DBPs like HAA5s and TTHMs are tested for quarterly and are reported on a Locational Running Annual Average (LRAA). The LRAA for this quarter for Haloacetic Acids was 70 parts per billion for testing site 700 and 98 parts per billion for testing site 701. As reference, the maximum contaminant level under EPA regulations is 60 parts per billion.

TTHMS levels for this quarter were 82 parts per billion for site 700 and 95 parts per billion for site 701. As reference, the maximum contaminant level under EPA regulation is 80 parts per billion.

Are HAA5 and TTHM violations unique to Steelton’s water system?
No. Many water systems in the country are dealing with TTHM and HAA5 violations due to more stringent EPA standards, changes in testing/reporting requirements, and aging water treatment infrastructure. Complying with these standards requires older water systems like Steelton’s to make long term capital improvements like the chlorine contact tank, which is anticipated to be completed by September of this year.

Why do disinfection byproducts like HAA5s and TTHMs occur in our water?
Virtually all water systems have disinfection byproducts of some level due to the fact that chlorine remains the most widely used chemical for water disinfection in the world. According to the Center for Disease Control, “Chlorine revolutionized water purification, reduced the incidence of waterborne diseases across the western world,” and “chlorination and/or filtration of drinking water has been hailed as the major public health achievement of the 20th century.” It is necessary to chlorinate water to eliminate bacteria that causes immediate emergency health risks. No such emergency health risks are occurring due to Steelton’s continued treatment of water.

While chlorination kills harmful pathogens in water (the primary concern of water treatment facilities), the process of chlorine interacting with organic material in water creates what are known as disinfection byproducts, primarily Trihalomethanes and Haloacetic Acids.

The most recent Filter Plant Performance Evaluation study by DEP found that operational standards and procedures at the plant are satisfactory and significantly improved. The only remaining course to address the DBP issue is to upgrade water plant infrastructure. This is being accomplished by the construction of the Chlorine Contact Tank and the addition of other equipment at the water plant.

It is recognized that the removal of immediate pathogenic threats in water through chlorination takes first priority. Higher levels of disinfection byproducts are considered a Tier II non-acute violation (like the one enclosed). A lack of chlorination and the resulting microbial pathogens that would be present in water, represent a Tier I emergency violation.

Am I required to buy bottled water?
No. The Department of Environmental Protection and EPA clearly state that you do not need to change your source of water.

What if I have concerns about long term health risks associated with HAA5s?
Please consult your physician if you have any concerns about health risks associated with HAA5s and TTHMs.

What is the Water Authority doing to reduce/eliminate DBPs?
Since the previous notice, the Steelton Water Authority has made significant progress on construction of the Chlorine Contact Tank. On top of this, we have made progress on a full-on assault on the DBP issue, including purchase and installation of state-of-the-art monitoring equipment and exploration of new filtration mediums to reduce DBPs.
Please be assured that the Steelton Authority has been aggressively working to make the plant upgrades needed to address this issue.

The construction of the Steelton Water Filtration Plant Chlorine Contact Tank is in its final stages. The construction of the tank is complete, but the installation of the pumps, interior piping and instrumentation has not yet been completed. The earliest estimates for total completion and testing is September. The Contact Tank is a significant part of addressing Steelton’s disinfection byproduct issue. It is being supplemented by additional upgrades at the Water Filtration Plant.

Because DBPs are reported on an annual average basis, there may be additional notices after the tank is built until the previously high readings from prior quarters are removed from the annual average.

If you have any additional questions about disinfection by-products or what we are doing, and have done, to ensure your drinking water is safe, please feel free to contact me at 717-939-9842
or Mark Handley at 717-939-0425 Ext. 5110. Douglas E. Brown, Borough Manager and Authority Secretary

Tier II DBP Violation

Tier II DBP Violation

Important Information About Your Non-Emergency Public Notice

The Steelton Borough Water Authority and staff take producing the highest quality drinking water very seriously. Over the past two years, the Authority has invested heavily into infrastructure and operational improvements in response to newer and more stringent environmental testing and reporting standards.

Some residents have asked questions about the Public Notices of non-emergency violations like the one enclosed related to disinfection byproducts. Below are answers to frequently asked questions:

Important Terms:

Chlorine Contact Tank: A 250,000 gallon contact tank that will allow for the chlorination of water post-filtration thus reducing the occurrence of disinfection byproducts.

Disinfection Byproducts (DBP): Chemicals found in drinking water when disinfectants such as chlorine react with naturally-occurring materials to form byproducts. Disinfectants, like chlorine, are used to kill microbes that can cause disease (e.g. gastrointestinal illness). Long term exposures to consistently high levels of some disinfection byproducts have been associated with an increased risk of cancer.

Haloacetic Acids (HAA5): One type of DBP when consistently consumed in large quantities over a long period of time may have adverse health impacts.

Locational Running Average (LRAA): The average of the four most recent quarterly samples collected at specific sample sites. Each quarter, the LRAA is recalculated for purposes of determining compliance and the need for a public notice.

Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL): The maximum level of DBPs in parts per billion that can exist in drinking water and remain compliant with EPA standards.

Source Water: Raw water that is drawn from the Susquehanna River and treated at the Steelton Water Treatment Plant. After treatment, the water is distributed through a network of water lines to Steelton residents.

Testing Locations: Two locations chosen in consultation with DEP that historically have the highest levels of DBPs.  Test sites most likely represent the worst-case reading for the system at any given time.

Turbidity: The cloudiness of raw source water. Turbidity is indicative of the amount of matter in source water and is higher when the Susquehanna River is more turbulent (i.e. during rain storms and high river levels). High turbidity many times indicates more organic matter thus higher DBPs.

Why am I receiving another drinking water violation notice?

The enclosed non-emergency notice is required due to the LRAA for Haloacetic Acids (HAA5) being higher than the maximum contaminant level at both testing locations for this quarter.

The level of DBPs depends on many factors, including temperature, weather, and source water turbidity. The more organic matter in source water the higher the occurrence of DBPs. Regardless of conditions, the Steelton Water Plant must always chlorinate water to remove immediate pathogens. This treatment process can lead to the formation of DBPs.

DBPs like HAA5s are tested for quarterly and are reported on a Locational Running Annual Average (LRAA). The LRAA for this quarter for Haloacetic Acids was .73 parts per billion for testing site 700 and .79 parts per billion for testing 701. As reference, the maximum contaminant level is .60.

Are HAA5s violations unique to Steelton’s water system?

No. Many water systems in the country are dealing with HAA5 violations due to more stringent EPA standards and changes in testing/reporting requirements. Complying with these standards requires older water system’s like Steelton’s to make long term capital improvements like the chlorine contact tank, which is currently being constructed.

Why do disinfection byproducts like HAA5s occur in our water?

Virtually all water systems have disinfection byproducts of some level due to the fact that chlorine remains the most widely used chemical for water disinfection in the world. According to the Center for Disease Control, “Chlorine revolutionized water purification, reduced the incidence of waterborne diseases across the western world,” and “chlorination and/or filtration of drinking water has been hailed as the major public health achievement of the 20th century.” It is necessary to chlorinate water to eliminate bacteria that causes immediate emergency health risks. No such emergency health risks are occurring due to Steelton’s continued treatment of water.

While chlorination kills harmful pathogens in water (the primary concern of water treatment facilities), the process of chlorine interacting with organic material in water creates what are known as disinfection byproducts, primarily Trihalomethanes and Haloacetic Acids.  While operational methods continue to be maximized, the Steelton Water Plant has limited ability to chlorinate water post-treatment, meaning it has less ability to control DBP/chlorine interaction. The Chlorine Contact Tank will address this.

It is recognized that the removal of immediate pathogenic threats in water through chlorination takes first priority. Higher levels of disinfection byproducts are considered a Tier II non-acute violation (like the one enclosed). A lack of chlorination and the resulting microbial pathogens that would be present in water, represent a Tier I emergency violation.

Am I required to buy bottled water?

No. The Department of Environmental Protection and EPA clearly state that you do not need to change your source of water.

What if I have concerns about long term health risks associated with HAA5s?

Please consult your physician if you have any concerns about health risks associated with HAA5s.

What is the Water Authority doing to reduce/eliminate DBPs?

Construction of the Chlorine Contact Tank commenced in February 2017. The tank is slated to be complete by Fall of this year. The chlorine contact tank will allow for the chlorination of water post treatment as opposed to chlorinating raw water. This allows greater control over chlorine interaction with DBPs.

The Authority is also working with its engineers and experts at Penn State University to finalize new, advanced treatment techniques to supplement the chlorine contact tank.

If you have any additional questions about disinfection by-products or what we are doing, and have done, to ensure your drinking water is safe, please feel free to contact me at 717-939-9842 or Mark Handley at 717-939-0425 Ext. 5110.

Douglas E. Brown, Borough Manager and Authority Secretary

Click to Read the Tier II Notification

Steelton Borough is Looking for a Vacancy Board Chair

A qualified resident is sought to fill the position of Steelton Borough Vacancy Board Chair for the calendar year 2017. The Chair is responsible for running the meetings of the Steelton Vacancy Board, which will only meet as-needed.

Whenever a vacancy occurs in any elective borough office, Steelton Borough Council fills the vacancy by appointing, by resolution, a registered voter of the borough. If Council fails to do so within 30 days, the Steelton Borough Vacancy Board meets to consider candidates to fill the vacancy. The Vacancy Board consists of the Steelton Borough Council, and one registered voter of the borough that serves as chair. Additionally, if the vacancy board fails to fill the vacancy within the allotted time, the chair of the vacancy board must petition the court of common pleas to fill the vacancy.

Idea candidates should be responsive, objective, and work well in a group setting. Experience with parliamentary procedure is a plus.

Interested candidates must submit a resume to Douglas E. Brown, Borough Manager, at dbrown@steeltonpa.com.

Council will appoint a vacancy chair no later than April 3, 2017.